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Magazines and Reviews
			
766                    CHURCH REVIEW



                Magazines and Reviews.


           NEGRO SONG WRITERS OF AMERICA.

   The Negro is the coming musician of the United States. So thinks
John Edward Bruce, one of the commissioners from New York State
to the Tennessee Centennial Exposition.  He has an article on the
subject in the Boston Evenzng Transcript in which he tells of some
of the songs written by negroes. The first one he mentions is "Listen
to the Mocking-Bird," by George Millburn, a street minstrel, who,
being too poor to publish it, sold it to Winner, who has generally re-
ceived credit for it. Mr. Bruce continues: "Mr. Charles W. Ander-
son, one of the commissioners appointed by Governor Morton to the
Nashville (Tenn.), Exposition, has gathered together in four im-
mense volumes all of the music thus far writsen and published by
negroes in this country, and has placed it on exhibition in the New
York booth in the Negro building at Nashville where daily recitals
from it are given by Mr. E. C. Brown, a young negro pianist. These
concerts are quite a feature at the Negro Building, and attract many
visitors to the New York booth, who are charmed as much by the
skillful playing of Mr. Brown as by the sweetness and melody of the
music of these composers of his race." In this collection are "Carry
Me back to Old Virginny," by James A. Bland; "All Coons Look
Alike to Me," by Ernest Hogan; "The Tennessee Centennial
March," by William J. Accoe; "Love is the Tenderest of Themes,"
by Will M. Cook; "The Fatal Wedding," and "The Baggage Coach
Ahead," by Gussie L. Davis. Of Mr. Davis, Mr. Bruce says: "Gussie
L. Davis has written more songs, perhaps, than any other young man
in this country. He is the young negro song-writer who won the
second prize recently given by the New York World for the best
song written by an American song-writer   He was really entitled to
first prize, but the judges took into account the fact that he is a ne-
gro and gave him second prize. ..... More than 500,000 of his
best songs have been sold within the past dozen years, and there is
not a city in the United States where they are not sung or played by
the bands."  Mr.  Bruce's remark about the negro as the coming
musician of America is, he thinks, proven true by Will M. Cook's
song mentioned above. The same composer has written in addition
a clever opera and a negro national hymn.--Literary Digest.




			
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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 15, Num. 3

Magazines and Reviews

Volume:  15
Issue Number:  03
Page Number:  766
Date:  01/1899


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