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Miscellaneous
			
                         MISCELLANEOUS                    67





                       Miscellaneous.



                  JEWS LEAVING PALESTINE.


   Many good people have looked for the day when the Jew would be in
possession of the land of his fathers. A correspondent of a German-Jewish
paper writing from there says that many of the later colonists are anxious
to get away.  It now appears that Palestine itself is nothing more than a
temporary station for the Jewish wanderers who are drawn away, as if by
some irresistible power, to America, Africa and even Australia. The main
reason why Jewish colonization has not taken strong root in Palestine is
the lack of markets and factories.  Without markets and factories, the
colonies cannot develop and gain a solid footing. And then, it must also
be borne in mind that the colonists here are entirely dependent upon what
they call "miracles," the whim of the weather. One dry year is sufficient
to throw the colonists into a state of destitution. They run into debt, and
their condition at once becomes critical. Besides, they are burdened with
heavy taxes. And the colonists complain that the Arabs frequently steal
the crops from the fields, and the cattle from the barns.--Ex.


                   THE NEW KIND OF INDIAN.


    The new Constitution, providing for a State of Oklahoma, has been
completed, and if approved by the President, will likely be voted on this
fall. The convention had 112 delegates, 100 of them Democrats and  12
Republicans. The Indian Territory had 55, Oklahoma 55, and the Osage
nation 2. It was supposed, because of special intellectual attainments, that
Oklahoma could dominate the convention as against the representatives of
the ignorant Indians. The Indians, fearing this danger, sent their very
best men. Many of them had been educated in Carlisle, Harvard and Cor-
nell. Not only were they able to cope with the best, but they soon showed
that they were as sound morally as they were able intellectually. These
men were trained in mission schools before they went to college, and the
missionary stamp was on them first and will remain longest. In Oklahoma
the saloon element in part controlled and sent professional politicians, men
of low moral standards and of mediocre ability. The Indians showed their
intelligence and ability by blocking measures that would likely injure their
people. Efforts were made to abolish trusts and monopolies and to con-
trol railways and other public carriers. The Indian Territory is to be




			
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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 24, Num. 1

Miscellaneous

Volume:  24
Issue Number:  01
Page Number:  67
Date:  07/1907


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