OHS home

Ohio Historical Society / The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
SEARCH

-or-

BROWSE


MANUSCRIPTS

NEWSPAPERS

PAMPHLETS

PHOTOGRAPHS
& PRINTS


SERIALS


HOME
7  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31 
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next
Black Brigade of Cincinnati: Being a Report of Its Labors and a Muster-Roll of Its Members; Together with Various Orders, Speeches, Etc. Relating to It.
			

6                    THE BLACK BRIGADE.

voting, and then and there organize themselves in such manner as may be
thought best for the defense of the city. Every man, of every age, be he
citizen or alien, who lives under the protection of our laws, is expected to
take part in the organization.
  " Witness my hand and the corporate seal of the city of Cincinnati, this 2d
day of September, A. D. 1862.
                                      "GEORGE HATCH, Mayor."
  At two o'clock on the morning of the same day, the Mayor
issued another proclamation, notifying the citizens that the
police force would perform the duty of a provost-guard, under
the direction of General Wallace.
  The Mayor's proclamation, under ordinary circumstances,
would be explicit enough.  "Every man, of every age, be he
citizen or alien," surely meant the colored people. A number
thought themselves included in the call; but, remembering the
ill-will excited by former offers for home defense, they feared
to come forward for enrollment. The proclamation ordered the
people to assemble "in the respective wards, at the usual places
of voting." The colored people had no places of voting. Added
to this, George Hatch was the same Mayor who had broken up
the movement for home defense, before mentioned.  Seeking to
test the matter, a policeman was approached, as he strutted in
his new dignity of provost-guard. To the question-humbly,
almost tremblingly, put--" Does the Mayor desire colored men
to report for service in the city's defense?" he replied: "You
know d      d well he does n't mean you.  Niggers ain't citi-
zens."  "But he calls on all-citizens and aliens.  If he does
not mean all, he should not say so."  "The Mayor knows as
well as you do what to write, and all he wants is for you nig-
gers to keep quiet." This was at nine o'clock on the morning
of the 2d. The military authorities had determined, however,
to impress the colored men for work upon the fortifications.
The privilege of volunteering, extended to others, was to be
denied to them. Permission to volunteer would imply some
freedom, some dignity, some independent manhood. For this
the commanding officer is alone chargeable. Mayor Hatch did
not mean the colored people, though he had written "every
person;" nor had he given his officers any orders at their first
going out. It may be said that the commanding General had
no time, in the press of business, to care for such small matters




			
Download High Resolution TIFF Image
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next

OHS Archives/Library Pamphlet Collection

Black Brigade of Cincinnati: Being a Report of Its Labors and a Muster-Roll of Its Members; Together with Various Orders, Speeches, Etc. Relating to It.

H.


HOME || CONTACT

ABOUT || CALENDAR || PLACES || RESOURCES || OHIO HISTORY STORE || LINKS || SEARCH
http://www.ohiohistory.org || Last modified
Ohio History Center 800 E. 17th Ave. Columbus, OH 43211 © 1996-2011 All Rights Reserved.