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Review of the Statement of the Faculty of Lane Seminary in Relation to the Recent Difficulties in that Institution
			
4

a deeper wound upon the feelings of the heart than by the abol-

ition of a society formed under a sense of duty combined with so 

much sympathy.  Surely, no ordinary reasons can justify such a 

procedure, and it will be extremely difficult to vindicate it from 

the charge of unusual severity.  And it may be added that slavery 

presents such enormity in cruelty and crime, that larger allowances 

should be made for the extremes of abolitionists than for those 

of any other class of men.  "Oppression maketh a wise man mad," 

whether he endures it himself or sees it inflicted on others.  

This is the only subject upon which madness is considered 

as evidence of wisdom.  Powerful minds take the deeper 

hold upon every subject they contemplate, and consequent-

ly are the more sympathetic, and easily driven to 

madness.  If the students were dreven to madness 

by the enormities presented they should have 

been the objects of pity rather than of severity!


			
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John Rankin Papers

Review of the Statement of the Faculty of Lane Seminary in Relation to the Recent Difficulties in that Institution


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