OHS home

Ohio Historical Society / The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
SEARCH

-or-

BROWSE


MANUSCRIPTS

NEWSPAPERS

PAMPHLETS

PHOTOGRAPHS
& PRINTS


SERIALS


HOME
8  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  133  134  135  136  137  138  139  140  141  142  143  144  145  146  147  148  149  150  151  152  153  154  155  156  157  158  159  160  161  162  163  164  165  166  167  168  169  170  171  172  173  174  175  176  177  178  179  180  181  182  183  184  185  186  187  188  189  190  191  192  193  194  195  196  197  198  199  200  201  202  203  204  205  206 
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next
Handbook, 1909
			

                    A. M. E. Church.                    7

It has presented the spirit of Christ in the black man. It
has developed a ministry of intelligence and consistent re-
ligious life; such men as the greatest denominations opera-
ting among colored people have been glad to seize. It has
enlarged the spirit of Americanism, infusing a quality of
assertiveness, wise self-care and patriotism, courageous
in defense of national government and strong in the grasp
of the forms and facts of the Christian religion.
  While it must be acknowledged that this Church has been
somewhat extravagant in the estimation of its numbers,
it is nevertheless large in its accomplishments and its
promises.  There are not more than five hundred thou-
sand members in the African Methodist Church on the
Western Continent. Between now and the end of our
Connectional first century, these five hundred thousand
are capable of amassing for special application, two mil-
lions of dollars. There can be no doubt of the ability of
our Church government to reach this end by careful ar-
rangements and faithful endeavor.


           GENERAL CONFERENCE OF 1908.
  Nearly one half of this quadrennium has already passed.
The Church is working with much harmony under the latest
rules. The men elected to General Offices and the Bishopric
are at their work most manfully as a rule; entirely, so far as
is known at this office. To say the General Conferences make
no mistake would be unreasonable, though we generally find
occasion to congratulate oursleves on the results of each
succeeding General Conference. Still there is no doubt
that our General Conference made mistakes.
  I. It suffered a large number of men, ministers and lay-
men, to sit promiscuously among delegates, though not
equipped with them. There is no church edifice in the A. M.
E. Connection sufficiently large to comfortably seat as a de-
liberative body, 550 persons. Much of the confusion and ill-




			
Download High Resolution TIFF Image
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next

OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Handbook, 1909


HOME || CONTACT

ABOUT || CALENDAR || PLACES || RESOURCES || OHIO HISTORY STORE || LINKS || SEARCH
http://www.ohiohistory.org || Last modified
Ohio History Center 800 E. 17th Ave. Columbus, OH 43211 © 1996-2011 All Rights Reserved.