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Handbook, 1909
			

8                    Hand Book 1909.

government of the Conference resulted from overcrowd-
ing.
  II. Fair dealing by all the Annual Conferences in electing
delegates would have diminished the number of delegates
by at least fifty or seventy-five.
  III. The General Conference refused to bind itself for
good order in negativing the proposition to discipline dis-
orderly members.  No great body means to be orderly
when it refuses to arrange for order.
  IV. The delegations in some cases were indiscreet in select-
ing floor-leaders, who, to insure good leadership, must be
the most consistent and considerate as well as forceful
and logical men of the body.
  V. The General Conference failed to give due considera-
tion to some of the most important wants of the Connec-
tion. Still, in the selection of men as leaders, experience
of over one year would seem to support well the action
of the Conference.

  Bishop James A. Handy remains sadly prostrate, men-
tally and physically. Bishop H. M. Turner is working on
the History of the Church, hoping to publish the first
volume in the next year. Bishop Benjamin T. Tanner is
apparently engaged in preaching among the brethren and
writing. All these men are living "in the harness," and
when they die they will die "in the harness."


            OUR DEPARTED BRETHREN.
  It would have been a solemn duty to publish in the
Hand Book a necrological list of the ministry. It is hoped
that the next year's book will not omit it.
  How rapidly we pass from the scenes of this life; this
writer has lived contemporarily with all the twenty-nine
other Bishops of the Church, save two; nearly half of
whom have entered their rest. Are they not too nearly




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Handbook, 1909


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