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Handbook, 1909
			


                        A. M.  E. Church.                        137

but not strong  and  robust as I might be in a different climate. We
have had much sickness and much suffering but no deaths; for which
we are thankful.  Knowing the field as I do I brought out with me sev-
eral missionaries and  began work  in earnest.  Although  these mis-
sionaries signed in the office of the Secretary of Missions, what we
understood to be an agreement yet when the Missionary Board met the
President and Secretary informed that Board that these persons had
gone to Africa against the protest of those officials, and that I alone
was responsible for their maintenance. This has crippled the work;
those who promised donations have fallen short; yet we have kept
six schools with 334 scholars open for nine months, and our work has
improved more in one year than in a whole quadrennium heretofore.
We  must  have  schools,  or  we  can  not  operate  any  longer.
The Likli at Port Lokkoh told me last week that the Church was wel-
come. so long as it brought book, but if it could not bring book, he did
not want us. So we operate in the midst of heathens and Mohammedans
who really want their children educated. The Postmaster at Port Lokkoh
who is a Christian said, the children must be taught, otherwise the
African felt that he could get along without our religion and would
not tolerate us any longer.
  I find the same sentiment in Liberia: so the department must ap-
propriate money for schools or cease to operate. The Shaffer High
School has done a good year's work, as well as the A. M. E. Seminary
here in Freetown. but neither has had funds to do the work. The Prin-
cipal of Shaffer High School, Arthington Liberia is Rev. H. K. Knight,
S. T. B.: the head of the A. M. E. Seminary, Sierra Leone is Rev. J. P.
Richards, B. D., a graduate of Wilberforce University.
   We have had to sit down and not travel for lack of funds. West
Africa is without money, and dominated by Mohammedans, and with-
out enterprises. Here we get mail once or twice a month and money
is sent many  times which does not reach us until after six weeks.
   We have concluded to travel after the annual conferences and col-
lect funds to run our work, and we beg  that we may have an open
door when we reach America. I have had $7,300 in two years; of that
amount I paid out for traveling before leaving America, and to bring
ten persons to Africa, $1600; I paid out for teaching, about $500; be-
sides $200 was used as traveling expenses by a delegate to the General
Conference, 1908; so that $2300 never saw Africa, leaving $5000 to pay
forty men for two years' service; about $5.00 per month to each mis-
sionary. The slaves in Georgia before the War received one bushel
of meal and 12 pounds of meat per month; some were given a quart
of molasses. This would cost in West Africa $7.15; so that the missiona-
ries have had two-thirds of a slave's fare. I only call attention to this




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Handbook, 1909


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