OHS home

Ohio Historical Society / The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
SEARCH

-or-

BROWSE


MANUSCRIPTS

NEWSPAPERS

PAMPHLETS

PHOTOGRAPHS
& PRINTS


SERIALS


HOME
10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  133  134  135  136  137  138  139  140  141  142  143  144  145  146  147  148  149  150  151  152  153  154  155  156  157  158  159  160  161  162  163  164  165  166  167  168  169  170  171  172  173  174  175  176  177  178  179  180  181  182  183  184  185  186  187  188  189  190  191  192  193  194  195  196  197  198  199  200  201  202  203  204  205  206 
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next
Handbook, 1909
			


148                      Hand Book 1909.

the conclusion that the Negro school is not very much of a white
man's burden, in at least three States, unless the white man is ready
to say that the division I suggest is not a fair one. And, in view of
the facts set forth for these three States, will the white man be able
to maintain successfully that he pays nearly all the cost of the Negro
public schools in these States?
  Time is not at hand to make a detailed study of this question for
all the eleven States under consideration.  What is true of the school
funds of the three States considered above is probably true of all the
others.  A somewhat careful study of this question for several years
leads me to the conclusion that the Negro school of the South is no
serious burden on the white taxpayer. The same conclusion will be
reached if the subject is approached from another standpoint. Sup-
pose the Negro children of these States were all white. Then it
will be found that it would cost to educate the present Negro school
population on the basis they were all white, just about five times as
much as it does now to give the same number of Negroes such educa-
tion as they are getting. You will observe that we always count the
Negroes in as a part of our population when we tell the world of our
progress in material things!
  In this connection I wish to call your attention to the comment of
two leading Southern papers on the recent exodus of Negroes from
southern Mississippi and northern Louisiana to the Yazoo Delta. The
Chattanooga Times said:
  "There is no doubt about the alarm and distress felt among our
farmers and planters of southern Mississippi and northern Louisiana
over the recent exodus of Negroes to the Delta region of Mississippi,
where, it appears, very attractive inducements have been held out to
them. We will probably never fully appreciate the value of the Ne-
gro as the dependable labor of this section until we lose him, and we
would learn this lesson from the situation in lower Mississippi and
Louisiana, we will make up our mind we are not going to lose him.
  On the same subject, the Charlotte Observer of January 17th, 1909,
said:
  "It is a singular fact that those who profess most antagonism toward
the Negro and most desire to get rid of him are often the very ones
who raise the loudest howl when the Negro begins departing of his
own accord.  Let a labor agent undertake to move Negroes from
one State to another and he encounters rigid prohibitory laws backed
up by strong public sentiment. Against similar activities within the
bounds of States laws forbidding enticement of labor are uncompromis-
ingly enforced. It is not merely that no one can be found immediate-
ly at hand to take the Negro's place, for in very many cases those




			
Download High Resolution TIFF Image
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next

OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Handbook, 1909


HOME || CONTACT

ABOUT || CALENDAR || PLACES || RESOURCES || OHIO HISTORY STORE || LINKS || SEARCH
http://www.ohiohistory.org || Last modified
Ohio History Center 800 E. 17th Ave. Columbus, OH 43211 © 1996-2011 All Rights Reserved.