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Handbook, 1909
			


154                      Hand Book 1909.

self in dreams of the millenium.
  A man's own pretensions make his hardest judges.
  None is so humble that his approval is depised by a great artist.
  Real education consists in the teaching of a single subject: how to
learn.


                 CARE OF A REFRIGERATOR.
  Selection of and care of a refrigerator are matters of vital mo-
ment to the family health. It is not simply a matter of keeping food
cool, but of keeping it hygienic.  A properly constructed refrigerator
produces a continuous circulation of cold dry air. Usually it is attained
by putting ice in the upper chamber, so constructed that as the air
chills it will sink into the food chambers below, forcing the warmer
air there to rise, and in turn to chill and sink.
  The old-time charcoal filling of the ice box or chest has largely
given way to mineral wool, in addition to a liberal air space, air be-
ing the best known non-conductor of heat. Galvanized iron has large-
ly replaced zinc as a lining.
  In buying a refrigerator, first make sure of the circulation. A sim-
ple test is to stand a lighted candle in the provision chamber, or
hold a match there; note if there is a sufficient current to make the
flame waver.  Of course the refrigerator must have ice in the box.
  Wood racks are subject to mold and mustiness. They will harbor
germs. Metal and glass shelves are better. A refrigerator should
be washed out thoroughly at least once a week. It should be kept
spick and span inside.
  Put nothing edible directly inside.
  Edibles should never touch the shelf surface.
  Never allow the dishes to slop over.
  Wash ice clean before putting it in.
  Remember that milk and other foods will take the odor of strong
smelling fruits, vegetables or cooked foods. Keep such things closely
covered, and put in bottom of food chamber. Milk and butter should
be kept on top shelf. There should be no dampness inside the
food box.
  Dishes should be perfectly clean before putting in the food cham-
ber.


  To make window glass opaque, dissolve 1 tablespoon epsom salts
in 1 glass beer or ale, which should be warm. Smear over the win-
dow, where it will form into a lacelike crystal, through which it is




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Handbook, 1909


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