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Handbook, 1909
			


160                      Hand Book 1909.

of the acid is removed. If a cleaning preparation contains an acid, as
most preparations on the market do, follow with an application of
whiting to neutralize the acid and preserve the surface from tarnish-
ing. Brasses cleaned with oil and rotten stone, or with tripoli,
will have a rich yellow tone. Acids and naphtha produce a tone
less rich.
  Common salt and oxalic acid, or vinegar, are very satisfactory
agents. Use a soft cloth, and rub the surface until all tarnish is
removed, then wash in plenty of water and wipe perfectly dry. If
the article is badly tarnished, try a solution of sal-soda to remove
all grease, then rub with oxalic acid, lemon juice, or strong vinegar.
Wash thoroughly and wipe dry. Polish with rotten stone, or tripoli,
and sweet oil, using a woolen cloth and rubbing hard. Wipe off this
scouring mixture and go over the surface with a dry flannel and dry
tripoli, or rotten stone. Finish with a soft, clean cloth. Brass and
copper will keep untarnished a long time if in a dry place.

                            Woodwork.
  When cleaning woodwork, bear in mind that paint is softened by
wet alkali, and if the solution is strong enough, it will dissolve the
paint. Potash and sal-soda are particularly caustic, while borax
is the least caustic. Of course, the stronger the solution the more
quickly it acts on the paint. It is obvious, therefore, that no strong
alkali should be applied to painted or varnished surfaces, and no
strong caustic soaps should be used on them.
  Should an alkali be spilled on such a surface, oil applied instantly
will neutralize the alkali and save the surface.
  Whiting is an excellent agent for cleaning painted woodwork.  Mix
it with cold water to the consistency of thick cream; have two pails
half filled with hot water, and a woolen cloth in each pail; keep a
third woolen cloth dry. Wring nearly all the water from one of the
cloths, dip in the whiting mixture, and rub hard the surface to be
cleaned, following the slight grain left by the painter's brush. Wash
off the whiting with the cloth and water from the second pail. Rinse
the cloth dry and wipe the surface with this, then rub perfectly dry
with a dry woolen cloth.
  An enamel finished surface requires different treatment. First
wipe off the dust, then follow with a clean woolen cloth dipped in
hot water and wrung as dry as possible. Rub dry with a second
woolen or cotton cloth. This dry rubbing gives brilliancy to the
surface; on soiled places which the damp cloth will not clean, rub
a little with powdered tripoli until the stain disappears. Don't press too
hard. Powdered pumice-stone will answer the same purpose.
  Avoid as much as possible using water on natural wood finish.




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Handbook, 1909


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