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Handbook, 1909
			


                       A. M. E. Church.                         161

Use oil or turpentine, or alcohol. If a place becomes very much
soiled, clean by rubbing with a woolen cloth wet with turpentine or
kerosene. The turpentine removes the gloss and should be followed
with oil. A little tripoli moistened with oil is excellent for a bad
spot. Once a year go over the woodwork with a mixture of paraffine
and turpentine, using equal parts. If the finish looks especially dry
and cracked, rub in pure oil. On dark wood, where the finish is dry,
cracked or faded looking, boiled linseed oil is better than paraffine
oil. The frequent application of oil, well rubbed in, will keep wood-
work exposed to heat, sun or moisture, in fairly good condition. Out-
side doors should be oiled with pure boiled linseed oil several times
each year.

                    Silver, Cut Glass and Steel.
  Silver will not often require cleaning if every time it is used it is
washed in plenty of soap and hot water and rubbed dry with clean,
soft towels. If silver tarnishes quickly, it indicates that there is
some gas in the house. Therefore, gas pipes and drain pipes should
be inspected. Sifted fine French whiting, wet with diluted alcohol or
ammonia and applied with a soft cloth, afterward polishing with
chamois, will keep silver in handsome condition.
  Sawdust from resinous wood, such as box or bass-wood, and free
from any hard substance, is excellent for cut glass. It absorbs
the moisture which cannot be reached with a towel. After wiping the
glass, bury it in a bed of sawdust for half an hour or more, then
brush with a soft brush and polish with a soft cloth.
  Remember that to scratch glass is to weaken that part so that a
little heat or cold will sometimes cause a break at that point. The
grain of sand at the bottom of the dish-pan or on the dish-cloth may
be the cause of splitting a beautiful dish.
  Use little soap on gilt china. To polish pewter, britannia and
blocked tinware use powdered rotten stone and oil, or oil and whit-
ing.
  Keep steel from rusting by covering with sweet oil or mutton tal-
low and wrapping with soft paper.
  To remove rusts, use oil and quicklime on the article. After
several days rub with oil and rotten stone, or bristol brick.
                         The Care of Gloves.
  Gloves require care to obtain their full wearing value. A cheap
glove is dear at any price. When the glove is put on for the first
time, talcum powder should be sifted over the hands. The glove
fingers should be worked on easily from the tip to the hand, keeping
the seams straight.




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Handbook, 1909


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