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Handbook, 1909
			


162                      Hand Book 1909.

  Always see that the gloves are dry before putting them away.
They keep best in a box especially for them. Lay them flat in this
after they have been aired and drawn into proper shape.
  Naphtha or gasoline may be used to clean white and light colored
gloves.  Both  are  dangerous  explosives  and  must  not  be  ex-
posed to fire. They are best used out of doors, or in a room with
the windows wide open. To cleanse the glove slip it on one hand
and dip a clean piece of white flannel in the cleansing fluid, wet
the glove all over and then rub it nearly dry with a second piece
of clean flannel. Keep on the hand until dry, in order to retain the
shape. Sprinkle talcum powder on them and hang in the air until
the odor has left. Chamois gloves for summer may be washed on
the hands, using a lather of white soap and water. Badly soiled
spots may be cleansed by rubbing them with magnesia. Before wash-
ing, rinse them in warm water and then in cold. Keep the gloves
on the hand until nearly dry, then pull them off carefully in their
proper shape, and hang to dry.
  To blacken kid gloves which have become white at the seams or
at the finger tips, dip a feather in a little olive oil containing a few
drops of black ink and brush lightly over the white places. Light
colored suede or undressed kid gloves may be cleaned with corn
meal or dry bread crumbs, dusting off with a piece of clean white
flannel.


                 OVERCOMING TUBERCULOSIS.
  Science has made great progress in dealing with tuberculosis. The
national congress held at Washington in October, 1908, demonstrated
the great and growing interest in the prevention, care and cure of
the disease. The most heated discussion occurred over the question
whether or not tuberculosis in cattle is communicable to human beings.
The great German scientist, Robert Koch, declared, as he had pre-
viously done, that the germ of tuberculosis in animals is different from
the germ causing tuberculosis of the lungs in man. He suggested the
possibility of disease being taken from tuberculous animals by per-
sons, but insisted that such cases were so rare, if they existed at all,
that none had been authenticated. He stood alone in this opinion.
The veterinarians present, and all other medical scientists who ex-
pressed their opinions, insisted that there is great danger of tubercu-
losis spreading from animals to human beings, and insisted that it
had not been proved that there are different kinds of tuberculosis
germs.




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Handbook, 1909


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