OHS home

Ohio Historical Society / The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
SEARCH

-or-

BROWSE


MANUSCRIPTS

NEWSPAPERS

PAMPHLETS

PHOTOGRAPHS
& PRINTS


SERIALS


HOME
10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  133  134  135  136  137  138  139  140  141  142  143  144  145  146  147  148  149  150  151  152  153  154  155  156  157  158  159  160  161  162  163  164  165  166  167  168  169  170  171  172  173  174  175  176  177  178  179  180  181  182  183  184  185  186  187  188  189  190  191  192  193  194  195  196  197  198  199  200  201  202  203  204  205  206 
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next
Handbook, 1909
			


                       A. M. E. Church.                         163

 Scientists in the United States and several foreign countries report-
ed encouraging experiments with serum used for the prevention and
cure of tuberculosis in a manner similar to vaccination for smallpox.
Much attention was given to consideration of methods of sanitarium
treatment and of general hygienic, social, industrial, and economic
aspects of turberculosis. The importance of instructing children in the
public schools with reference to taking proper care of themselves
was emphasized.
  The veterinarians reported the value, in the work of controlling
bovine tuberculosis, of the tuberculin test, which is the most accurate
method of diagnosing the disease. The urgent need of stamping out
bovine tuberculosis was reiterated, and veterinarians were a unit in
declaring the danger from the consumption of flesh or milk of tuber-
culous cattle. The American delegates urged establishment of a
federal bureau of health.
     Hygiene and Health-Home Treatment of Tuberculosis.
  The battle of medical science against the "great white plague,"
tuberculosis, has been persistent, unyielding, vigorous.  The success
met with has been more and more encouraging, so that now the dis-
ease is fought with an understanding of its nature, which makes a
successful and complete cure almost a certainty if the disease is taken
in hand in its early stages.
  A consensus of opinion among the leading investigators is that
consumption or tuberculosis is not hereditary, but is contagious, and
is curable. In the majority of cases where children develop con-
sumption, it may easily be proved that the disease developed from
contagion and was not hereditary. A predisposition to weak lungs
may favor the progress of the disease, once the germs find lodg-
ment.
   On the first sign of the disease a physician should be consulted. If
he recommends treatment at a sanitarium, and this cannot be afford-
ed, home treatment may possibly be very successfully employed.
The patient's bedroom should be the largest, sunniest and best venti-
lated in the house. Carpets and curtains should be as scarce as
possible, compatible with the esthetic sense. The bed should be at
least a foot from the wall.  A patient should not breathe hot air.
There should be as much rest out of doors as possible. It is vital
that the patient shall every moment breathe fresh air, and be in the
sunshine all the time possible. Pure air and sunshine are fatal to the
tubercle bacillus.
   Consumptives should be in the fresh air 24 hours out of the 24.
Sleeping in tents is often found beneficial. Rain and dampness




			
Download High Resolution TIFF Image
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next

OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Handbook, 1909


HOME || CONTACT

ABOUT || CALENDAR || PLACES || RESOURCES || OHIO HISTORY STORE || LINKS || SEARCH
http://www.ohiohistory.org || Last modified
Ohio History Center 800 E. 17th Ave. Columbus, OH 43211 © 1996-2011 All Rights Reserved.