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Handbook, 1909
			


 164                      Hand Book 1909.

are to be avoided, especially during the hours of sleep. Sleeping on
porches and piazzas, properly protected by awnings, has been very
successful in the treatment of many.
   Good, wholesome  foods, well  cooked,  are essential.  In general
such foods as will give the largest amount of nutrition with the small-
est amount of labor for the alimentary tract, are best, such as roast
or boiled beef, mutton, lamb, fresh vegetables and fruits, cereals,
mixed liberally with cream, plenty of sugar and good butter, and at
or between meals, six or more eggs, and from 2 to 3 quarts of milk,
distributed within the 24 hours. Indigestible things, such as sweets,
pasties, etc., must always be carefully avoided.
   The use of medicine should not be countenanced, except under a
physician's immediate direction.  Much actual harm is done by the
indiscriminate use of medicines recommended by friends. Always
consult a physician before using a medicine. The five fundamental
principles in the treatment of consumption are as follows: The
proper disposition of infective material; rest; fresh air and sunshine;
pure food and drink in abundance; use of medicines as directed by
a physician.
   The first practical consideration is the disposition of the infective
material. The most common form of infection is through the dried
sputum, which is taken up in the dust of the atmosphere. Infants
become infected from the dust of the floor, or by putting in their
mouths objects on which sputum may have been deposited. Con-
sumptive persons should never kiss children. Frequently the germs
are transferred in this way, and the expression of love becomes the
curse of fatal disease. The consumptive invariably, while indoors,
should have some cloth or tissue paper before the face during cough-
ing or sneezing. He should always spit into a receptacle made ex-
pressly for the purpose, or a moist cloth.


               DISINFECTANTS AND THEIR USE.
  Bear in mind the difference between a disinfectant and deodorant;
the former kills germs while the latter destroys odors but does not
kill germs. Many so-called disinfectants have very little germ-killing
power, and are simply deodorants.
  Cleanliness is the foremost agency in destroying disease germs.
Sunlight is a valuable destroyer of bacteria; its importance cannot be
overestimated. Moisture is favorable to the growth of bacteria.
Germs thrive in damp corners.
  Boiling water is one of the most efficient disinfectants; one-half
hour boiling destroys all disease germs.
  Bichloride of mercury or corrosive sublimate in solution, one part
to 1,000 parts of water, may be used for wiping infected woodwork,




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Handbook, 1909


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