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Handbook, 1909
			


                       A. M. E. Church.                           171

 Seeds, bulbs, roots, scions and plants are also mailable at the rate
of third-class postage, such as samples of wheat or other grain in its
natural condition, seedling potatoes, beans, peas, acorns, etc. Cut
flowers and botanical specimens go as fourth class.
  Rate.-One cent for each 2 ounces or fraction thereof.
  Fourth class.-Merchandise; namely, all matter not embraced in
the other three classes, and which is not in its form or nature liable
to destroy, deface, or otherwise damage the contents of the mail
bag, or harm the person of any one engaged in the postal service,
and not above the weight provided by law. Includes artificial flowers,
dried plants, botanical and geological specimens, samples of flour
or other manufactured grain for food purposes, blank address tags
or labels, queen bees when properly packed, dried fruit.
  Rate.-One cent per ounce or fraction thereof.
                         Foreign Postage.
  To Canada, Newfoundland and Mexico the rates are similar to
the United States domestic postage, except on second-class matter to
Canada. The latter is now 1 cent for each 4 ounces, or fraction
thereof, in bulk for publishers, which is the same as the rate for
single periodicals mailed by the general public. Letters cost 2 cents
per ounce; merchandise not exceeding 4 pounds 6 ounces, 1 cent per
ounce.
   To Great Britain and Ireland and Germany the letter rate is 2
cents per ounce or fraction thereof.


                      FORMULAS FOR SPRAYING.
                             Fungicides.
   Bordeaux Mixture.-Dissolve 6 lbs copper sulphate (blue vitriol) in
25 gallons of water. Slake 4 lbs fresh stone lime and dilute to 25
gallons. Strain carefully. Mix just before spraying. For peaches,
plums and other tender foliage add 25 to 30 gallons more water.
Dissolve sulphate by hanging it in a cheesecloth bag in water.
   Copper Sulphate Solution.-Dissolve 2 to 4 lbs of copper sulphate
in 50 gallons of water as recommended for making bordeaux mix-
ture. Use as a spray before the foliage appears. When used on
foliage dilute to about 1 lb to 200 to 300 gallons of water.
   Ammoniacal Copper Carbonate--Mix copper carbonate 6 oz., am-
monia 3 pts. and water 50 gallons together as follows: Make a paste
of the copper carbonate with a little water, dilute the ammonia 7
or 8 times with water and add to the paste mixture, stirring until




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Handbook, 1909


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