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Handbook, 1909
			


                       A. M. E. Church.                         177

Amherst idea would seem to invite imitation at other collegiate
and university centers.
  "The country preacher fills a sphere of usefulness quite different
in its environment from that of his urban colleague. His daily
contacts with the life of the people about him are necessarily more
intimate. Hence there is the greater need for keeping his mental
outlook wider than  his immediate  environment.       He  must have
glimpses into the outer world more  realistic than those afforded
by the current literature, perhaps often too scant, that reaches his
study-table.  The seeming narrowness of his surroundings in reality
increases his opportunity for the personal uplift of others. His
daily walks and talks must be known of all. The more informatory
they can be made, the greater stimulus he can impart to others for
both practical usefulness and higher living. The country parson has
unusual contacts, and the institution of education that promotes his in-
tellectual activities by increasing his points of view of the human life
and occupations that surround him multiplies his power for good."


  Institutions for the education of the colored youth are generally
stingily financed because the race is yet poor, and the rich white
friends are few-and, particularly, a colored college in the North re-
ceives little attention. President Scarborough, of Wilberforce Uni-
versity, Ohio, must have been almost as much surprised as gratified
when Mr. Carnegie, with his inclusive beneficence, offered to pay
half the expense for a $35,000 dormitory for girls when the rest is
secured. Wilberforce is a most worthy institution, conducted wholly
by colored people, and we trust that a much larger sum can be raised
for endowment. The sum would seem very modest for a white insti-
tution.

  Three races, Caucasian, Eskimo, African, stood together at the Pole
where since the world began no human foot had trod before these
last achievements. Of all creatures only man can endure either ex-
treme of cold or heat, and no matter what his race. It has been said
that the Negro must be confined to the hot climates, but the case of
the Negro, Henson, proves what has needed no proof since the race
fled from our Southern States to Canada.

                         CLEANING HINTS.
   For wax, cover with absorbent paper and press with warm iron.
   For mildew, try lemon juice, followed by bleaching in direct sun-
light.




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Handbook, 1909


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