OHS home

Ohio Historical Society / The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
SEARCH

-or-

BROWSE


MANUSCRIPTS

NEWSPAPERS

PAMPHLETS

PHOTOGRAPHS
& PRINTS


SERIALS


HOME
10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67  68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  77  78  79  80  81  82  83  84  85  86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112  113  114  115  116  117  118  119  120  121  122  123  124  125  126  127  128  129  130  131  132  133  134  135  136  137  138  139  140  141  142  143  144  145  146  147  148  149  150  151  152  153  154  155  156  157  158  159  160  161  162  163  164  165  166  167  168  169  170  171  172  173  174  175  176  177  178  179  180  181  182  183  184  185  186  187  188  189  190  191  192  193  194  195  196  197  198  199  200  201  202  203  204  205  206 
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next
Handbook, 1909
			


178                      Hand Book 1909.

  There is nothing better for beaver hats and cloth than a corn-meal
bath.
  For iron rust, sprinkle with salt, moisten with lemon juice, and lay
in the sun.
  For blood stains, wash in cold water, then rub with naphtha soap
and soak in warm water.
  Coffee stains will yield to boiling water. Spread stained part over
a cup or bowl, and pour water through.
  Paint is best removed with benzine or turpentine. If delicate goods
are stained, use chloroform or naphtha.
  Wagon grease yields to either oil or lard rubbed on stain, followed
by careful washing with warm water and soap.
  Chocolate stains may be removed by soaking in cold water, then
sprinkling with borax and washing in boiling water.
  For fresh ink, try milk. Allow stained portion to stand in milk
until the latter is discolored,  then  use  more.    Salt  and  lemon
juice will remove dried ink stains. However, this is apt to take out
color of goods also.
  Aigrettes, ostrich feathers and Paradise plumes should be cleaned
in gasoline, shaken out and dried in the wind. Wings and breasts
can be cleaned by shaking and rubbing gently with corn-meal in a
cardboard box; then shake thoroughly in the air. Light furs can be
cleaned in the same way.
  It is economical to have two pair of shoes which can be worn alter-
nately. This plan is of advantage from a sanitary standpoint also.
A shoe worn every other day does not settle to the foot and lose its
good appearance as does a shoe worn every day. Moreover, the shoes
worn every other day are better aired, which is necessary for comfort.
Shoes should be kept in a ventilated box.



 THE FOLLOWING CENTENARIES WERE OBSERVED IN 1909.
  The year 1909 was noteworthy for the large number of famous
people who were born just a century before. The birth roll for 1809
includes a long list of statesmen, soldiers, musicians, authors, inventors
and scientists. The centenaries of many of these great men will be
celebrated with important exercises. Among the anniversaries are the
following:
  January 19, Edgar Allan Poe.
  February 3, Mendelssohn, the musician, and Joseph Johnston, the
Confederate soldier.
  February 12, Abraham Lincoln and Charles Darwin.
  February 15, Cyrus McCormick, inventor of the reaping machine.




			
Download High Resolution TIFF Image
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next

OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Handbook, 1909


HOME || CONTACT

ABOUT || CALENDAR || PLACES || RESOURCES || OHIO HISTORY STORE || LINKS || SEARCH
http://www.ohiohistory.org || Last modified
Ohio History Center 800 E. 17th Ave. Columbus, OH 43211 © 1996-2011 All Rights Reserved.