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Handbook, 1909
			


182                       Hand Book 1909.

  It is fair to surmise that these three states are representative
of the condition in the South, and it is likely enough that the situa-
tion in other states is even more favorable to the Negro; and instead
of the Negro being a burden he is helping to bear burdens. And
this is his earnest desire, to be a real man in the affairs, of Church
and State.


                 THE IRREPRESSIBLE NEGRO.
  That irrepressible, ever-present and never-to-be-forgotten Negro is
in the lime light again. Although a child of the tropics he is heard
from this time with Peary at the North pole. One account says
that Matthew Henson, Peary's trusted assistant, was with the Navi-
gator when he made his polar observations. A later account says
he was not there.  At any rate, Henson was the last American that
saw Peary when he made his final dash for the pole. Herbert L.
Bridgman, secretary of the Peary Arctic Club referring to this trust-
ed Negro says:
  "Mat Henson has always been Peary's man Friday. He is the
best man in the North for driving dogs. The Eskimos swear by
him. He can travel faster and is an invaluable man of the party.
After all these years of faithfulness, all the years of struggle that
Mat has made, it would have been rank injustice not to have per-
mitted Henson to reach the pole. He was the one man on whom
Peary could lean, and he is straight-forward and honest."
 After all is it not interesting to note how the Negro manages to
always get in? He manages to be on hand and shares a part of
the glory of many a brilliant occasion in spite of himself and in
spite of those who would retard his progress. Somehow the Negro
is intimately and permanently interwoven in the life and thought of
this Nation and of the world.-S. W.  Christian Advocate.


         A BLACKENED FACE BRUTE PLEADS FOR CLEMENCY
                       BUT IS DENIED.
 William H. Mitchell, of Georgia, some time ago was convicted of
criminal assault. It will be remembered that Mitchell, who is a
white man, blackened his face and posed as a Negro in his dastardly
crime. Evidence sufficient was available and he was convicted and
sentenced to the chain gang. Governor Brown was appealed to for
clemency which he refused, saying:
  "Should the clemency asked for in the present case be extended,
there is grave danger that it would bear fruits of sorrow in every




			
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OHS/National Afro-American Museum & Cultural Center Pamphlet Collection

Handbook, 1909


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