OHS home

Ohio Historical Society / The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
SEARCH

-or-

BROWSE


MANUSCRIPTS

NEWSPAPERS

PAMPHLETS

PHOTOGRAPHS
& PRINTS


SERIALS


HOME
1  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22 
Item Description Next Next
Education for the Masses. A Symposium
			
132                   CHURCH REVIEW.

  That feature of the Democratic party which denounces the
Republican doctrine of a fair vote and an honest count as a blow
at Southern home rule, and as sure to react upon the Republican
voters of the South if enacted into law, is a menace pure and
simple; that such a law would lead to resistance and bloodshed,
is an argument used in 186O when Abraham Lincoln became
President of the United States. If we are to have more resistance
and bloodshed in order that the just fruits of the war amend-
ments shall be equally enjoyed by all, let us have them; and if
this Republican plank, with sufficient warrant in the Constitu-
tion, means anything at all, it means that one citizen is as equal
before the laws as another, and must be protected in his equal
rights, whatever opposition may be opposed to the principle.
Rights that are worth having are worth fighting for, literally and
metaphorically.
   It is unnecessary here to discuss in detail the platform of the
Republican party. It embodies the best administrative policy
for this Nation, as experience has amply shown through troublous
and through quiet and prosperous years. The Republican party
has never lost the confidence of the Nation when it was true to
its platform, to its traditions, to the people who trust it. But
when it has sacrificed the substance for the shadow, when it has
worshipped Mammon and betrayed justice and human liberty, it
has failed of success and deserved defeat.





                               IV.

             EDUCATION FOR THE MASSES.-A SYMPOSIUM.

                         BY E. MOORE.

     I.--THROUGH WHAT GRADES SHOULD POPULAR EDUCATION BE
          CARRIED?
    II.--HOW MUCH OF THE INDUSTRIAL SHOULD IT EMBRACE?
   III.--SHOULD SPECIAL ATTENTION  BE GIVEN TO MORAL  AND
         RELIGIOUS INSTRUCTION?

  THE subject presupposes assent to the view that popular edu-
cation of some kind and extent is essential. But through what
grades should it be carried? Perhaps we shall be better prepared
to offer a more satisfactory answer to the question by thinking
for a few minutes why popular education is necessary at all.
The student of history knows that every civilized nation, ancient




			
Download High Resolution TIFF Image
Item Description Next Next

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 09, Num. 2

Education for the Masses. A Symposium

Volume:  09
Issue Number:  02
Page Number:  132
Date:  10/01/1892


HOME || CONTACT

ABOUT || CALENDAR || PLACES || RESOURCES || OHIO HISTORY STORE || LINKS || SEARCH
http://www.ohiohistory.org || Last modified
Ohio History Center 800 E. 17th Ave. Columbus, OH 43211 © 1996-2011 All Rights Reserved.