OHS home

Ohio Historical Society / The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
SEARCH

-or-

BROWSE


MANUSCRIPTS

NEWSPAPERS

PAMPHLETS

PHOTOGRAPHS
& PRINTS


SERIALS


HOME
1 
Item Description Next Next
Theosophy and the Theosophical School
			
                 EDUCATION FOR THE MASSES.                   153

religious teaching should accompany the daily work of our com-
mon schools. I do not mean to say that a Baptist, Methodist or
Episcopal school teacher should teach religious ideas to their
school children, according to the tenets of their respective denom-
inations, but I do mean to say, that every school teacher should
teach those common tenets of our Christianity in which about all
denominations concur. Text-books embodying these ideas could
be easily prepared by committees composed of men and women
of different religious beliefs.
  When special attention will have been given to moral and
religious instruction in our public schools for a score of years,
we shall behold purer families, a nobler church, a grander nation
and a more prosperous people. Then every conscientious school
teacher will be able to utter with truth the words of Horace:
"Exegi  monumentum  aere perennius"--("I have erected a
monument more enduring than bronze").



                               V.
             THEOSOPHY AND THE THEOSOPHICAL SCHOOL.

                       BY R. K. POTTER.

  THE term " theosophy " seems to have been first used in the third
century, A.D., by the Neoplatonists, or Gnostics of Alexandria,
and from that time various persons or cults have been called
theosophical. The fundamental principles of the doctrine, how-
ever, were taught many thousands of years ago, when Buddha
formulated his system, or earlier still, when the ancient Rishis,
or Wise Men, wandered over the plains of India.
  As the derivation of the word implies, the term "theosophy" de-
notes those forms of religious thought which claim especial in-
sight into the nature and workings of the Deity.  Theosophy
does not claim to be a religion, but it does claim to be the truth
underlying all religions; and the members of the Theosophical
Society adopt as their motto, " There is no religion higher than
truth."  Theosophy is not an outgrowth of Buddhism, although
many Buddhists see in its doctrines the reflection of Buddha; it
is not Christianity, as Christianity is usually understood, although
many Christians find within it the doctrines of the " meek and
lowly Jesus."  It professes to give to its followers the esoteric, or
inner spiritual meaning of the great religious teachers of the
world.
  Its apostles assert that the proof of its validity lies in its uni-
versality, in the fact that it unifies the records and the instructions
of the great teachers from Buddha, or earlier times, to Christ,




			
Download High Resolution TIFF Image
Item Description Next Next

African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 09, Num. 2

Theosophy and the Theosophical School

K.

Volume:  09
Issue Number:  02
Page Number:  153
Date:  10/01/1892


HOME || CONTACT

ABOUT || CALENDAR || PLACES || RESOURCES || OHIO HISTORY STORE || LINKS || SEARCH
http://www.ohiohistory.org || Last modified
Ohio History Center 800 E. 17th Ave. Columbus, OH 43211 © 1996-2011 All Rights Reserved.