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Voice from Heaven
			
166                    CHURCH REVIEW.

profits. Probably the happiest man in the two kingdoms was
this erstwhile Lisbon exile.  Palos furnished two large vessels,
victualed and manned, and Columbus secured the third ready
for the voyage.
  Seamen were impressed--volunteers not forthcoming.  Only
one of these vessels had a deck, the other two were open, at least
so writes Peter Maytyer. One hundred and twenty souls com-
prised the crews of these three ships. On the 3d day of August,
1492, just as the morning sun was peeping over the eastern hills,
anthems were sung and prayers could be heard for the safety of
the little squadron.  Sweethearts, wives and mothers bade good-
by to kindred or lovers, as the caravels unfurled their sails to
the early morning breezes and westward plowed over the briny
deep. No cheers or acclamations were given, only weeping was
seen and lamentations heard. Columbus, upright and resolute
as ever, paced his deck-the proudest and most exultant admiral
of Aragon and Castile.
  The commencement of the voyage, marked as it was by extra-
ordinary turmoil and excitement, did not prevent Columbus
keeping a journal, in which was detailed regularly all the events of
the day. It was to be shown to the King of Spain. The gran-
deur and solemnity of his expedition are fittingly portrayed.
The stately prologue with which it opens, sets forth his motives
and views with the loftiness of spirit and religious enthusiasm
which could be possessed only by one who has been sanguine,
even amid the malevolent accusations of enemies, and serene,
because wholly unaccused by conscience.
  We propose to consider in a future article how far Columbus
is entitled to the fulsome praise accorded him by some modern
historians. The contrast is great when compared to the kind
of encomiums he received by his contemporaries.




                              VII.

                  IN MEMORIAM ARTHUR W. UPSHAW.

                     A VOICE FROM HEAVEN.

                          BY P. W. WADE.
              I SHINE in the light of God,
                His image stamps my brow;
              Through the shadows of death my feet have trod,
                But I reign in glory now!
              No breaking heart is here,
                No keen and thrilling pain,
              No wasted cheek where the burning tear
                Hath rolled and left its stain.




			
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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 09, Num. 2

Voice from Heaven

W.

Volume:  09
Issue Number:  02
Page Number:  166
Date:  10/01/1892


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