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Afro-American Christian Scholar
			
 180                     CHURCH REVIEW.


                              XII.
          THE AFRO-AMERICAN CHRISTIAN SCHOLAR.

                       BY REV. J. C. EMBRY.

  To all persons interested in the cause of Christian education
occasions like this must ever be a source of real pleasure. We
come from west, south, north, east, to make notes of the pro-
gress of our school. We are anxious to bear testimony to the
excellence of its work. We know that thousands of our best
people are looking to this college for the highest in the training
of the youth committed to its care.
  The alumnae of Wilberforce, made such by graduation here or
by honorary adoption, has become a goodly company. The
lines of light radiating from this center, through the influence of
these sons and daughters of Wilberforce, shed lustre upon all the
circles of activity among us. This influence, we are wont to
believe, is a quickening and healthful influence.      Hence  we
reasonably expect to see an increasing number of our young
people, from all parts, finding their way here in quest of intellec-
tual and moral culture, founded upon the principle of self-help
and self-respect to be found nowhere else. We have adopted,
therefore, as the subject' of our address, " The Afro-American
Christian Scholar: His Place in Society and his Duty."
   First, our thought is of the title, "Afro-American" versus the
title "Negro." Second, of that scholarship and moral culture,
whose ethics and philosophy have been the tried stone of Christian
doctrine in its every scheme of research, and as the foundation
of its reasoning and practice. Finally we refer to the rightful
place in society, and the bounden duty, of the persons thus
equipped for usefulness in the various fields where Providence
may call them.
       I. "AFRO-AMERICAN" versus THE TITLE "NEGRO."
  We prefer this title to all others for the reason that it is eupho-
nious, beautiful, true. It is a correct as well as a euphonious
description of the class of men to whom it should be applied.
We believe that the scholarly descendants of our African fore-
fathers should neither adopt nor recognize the intended stigma
which European and American slaveholders invented for us.
We have the highest and most affectionate regard for "the
brother in black," as we ought to have for all the children of our
Father's household. The boy in black is as sure to be heard
from in the years just before us as the government of God is sure
and just. But the point we make is that the title "Negro" is too
narrow and exclusive to comprehend the race. It is certain that
all Africans are not Negroes, nor are all who are Negroes Afri-
cans. But why should the race-name of the millions in Africa,




			
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African Methodist Episcopal Church Review, Vol. 09, Num. 2

Afro-American Christian Scholar

C.

Volume:  09
Issue Number:  02
Page Number:  180
Date:  10/01/1892


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