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Centennial: The American Negro from 1776-1876; Oration Delivered at Avondale, Ohio, 1876
			
                         [ 16 ]
          "On Fame's eternal camping ground
             Their silent tents are spread;
            While glory guards with solemn round
             The bivouac of the dead."

 1812 TO 1863--THE COLORED AMERICAN IN THE WAR OF 1812.
    The superior manhood and sterling soldierly qualities
so clearly evinced by the negro, had won for him golden
opinions both in America and England.  The British army
had ample reason to remember his promptness and severity
in battle; while the best classes in both sections of the
country had come to regard him with sentiments of high
esteem and appreciation.  Those who afore time doubted
his humanity and capacity, now acknowledged him as an
element of strength in the colony.
    But we come to the war of 1812. The same spirit
which distinguished the negro soldier in the early struggles
of the colonies, intensified by the gratitude bestowed upon
him, lifted him into conspicuous notice in this hour of trial.
In every section of the country he was found among the
patriotic young men who were rallying under the national
standard. In many instances, the slave, as well as the free
colored man, arrayed himself among the defenders of the
country.
    On the 21st day of September, 1814, Major General
Andrew Jackson issued an official document from the head-
quarters of the seventh military district at Mobile, ad-
dressed to the free colored people of Louisiana. The
following sentences will show the character of the docu-
ment: "As sons of freedom, you are now called upon to
defend our most inestimable blessings. As Americans, your
country looks with confidence to her adopted children for a
valorous support, as a faithful return for the advantages en-
joyed under her mild and equitable government. As fathers,
husbands, and brothers, you are summoned to rally around




			
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OHS Archives/Library Pamphlet Collection

Centennial: The American Negro from 1776-1876; Oration Delivered at Avondale, Ohio, 1876

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