OHS home

Ohio Historical Society / The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920
SEARCH

-or-

BROWSE


MANUSCRIPTS

NEWSPAPERS

PAMPHLETS

PHOTOGRAPHS
& PRINTS


SERIALS


HOME
10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39 
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next
Centennial: The American Negro from 1776-1876; Oration Delivered at Avondale, Ohio, 1876
			
                          [ 23 ]
was the advent of the colored soldier that brought victory to
our national arms.  It was his valuable service, when the
nation was exhausted and fainting, that saved our national
honor and overthrew the slave oligarchy. This is the rela-
tion the negro soldier of this country sustained to the vic-
tories of our national arms.  And no impartial historian
will ever pass by this fact, for,

              "It shall flash through coming ages,
               It shall light the distant years;"

    And a grateful republic will remember that its most
precious stones were cemented by the blood of her negro
soldiers, whose devotion to the flag was deathless, and
whose fame will never fade.

          THE NEGRO SOLDIER'S PLACE IN HISTORY.
    A man is never honored for what another does for
him or makes him. The man who performs the act of
charity or humanity is praised, not the one for whom the
act is performed.  Men are not to be praised because Christ
died for them, but Christ is to be praised because he died
for men.  Had the Emancipation Proclamation been issued
because the government had reached those moral grounds
on which it felt it necessary, from a force of conscience, to
free the slave, then the negro would have been placed under
undying gratitude to the government.  But it was not so.
And if the war had continued for years, and if the Federal
arms had triumphed, and if the negro had been set free
without himself firing a gun, to whom would the praise of
deliverance belong?  Not to the negro, but to the govern-
ment.
    I am grateful that the war did not end in this manner.
I thank that wise Being, with whom there is no conjecture,
no accident, no chance, that he ordained that victory should




			
Download High Resolution TIFF Image
PreviousPrevious Item Description Next Next

OHS Archives/Library Pamphlet Collection

Centennial: The American Negro from 1776-1876; Oration Delivered at Avondale, Ohio, 1876

W.


HOME || CONTACT

ABOUT || CALENDAR || PLACES || RESOURCES || OHIO HISTORY STORE || LINKS || SEARCH
http://www.ohiohistory.org || Last modified
Ohio History Center 800 E. 17th Ave. Columbus, OH 43211 © 1996-2011 All Rights Reserved.