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Description of the Work at the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, Tuskegee Alabama, A
			
                 THE NEGRO IN THE SOUTH.

   SOMETHING ABOUT BOOKER T. WASHINGTON AND HIS WORK AT
                       TUSKEGEE, ALA.

THE SHOPS AND THE INDUSTRIAL SYSTEM AT TUSKEGEE WHICH THIS
     CLEVER COLORED MAN HAS ESTABLISHED FOR HIS RACE--
                      A MOSES OF TO-DAY.

    "Northerners see the South from palace car windows and go
home to write editorials upon the Negro problem."
    Such was the comment of a Southern colored man upon the
manner in which his race comes before the public in Northern
journals.  This statement is, of course exaggerated, but there is
enough foundation in the criticism to make it, worth repeating.
The Southern Negroes are not known in the North; but neither
are they sufficiently known to the better class of their own race in
the South. One of this class, Booker T. Washington, President of
the Colored Normal and Industrial Institute, Tuskegee, Ala., has
come to recognize the fact, and his desire to better conditions has
resulted in the Tuskegee Conference, which has met annually for
the last five years and has attracted wide attention.
    Our Afro-American citizens are becoming more diversified as
education among them advances.  There are already among them
people of education and refinement, with whom it is as difficult to
connect the thought of slavery, as with educated and refined white
people.  A most hopeful outlook for the race lies in the growing
sense of responsibility awakened in members of the better class
for their less fortunate brothers and sisters, and their sincere de-
sire to work for their uplifting, which accompanies it.  The Tus-
kegee Conference is doing much to develop and foster these feelings.
    But it would be the play of Hamlet, with the hero left out, to
describe this Conference without first telling of the  Tuskegee
School.  This institution is the fruitage of Booker T. Washing-
ton's brain and heart.  It is the means by which his powerful in-
fluence will be felt perennially.  Mr. Washington is one of the
world's truly great men.  Starting with nothing in external con-
ditions which was favorable to progress, either mental or material,




			
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Description of the Work at the Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, Tuskegee Alabama, A


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