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Progress of the Negro Race: Address at a Patriotic Race Service, Philadelphia
			
Twenty-fifth Regiment of Infantry, United States troops
(colored)."
  This resolution was adopted with amendments on December
6, 1906. It was the first resolution offered in the Senate relating
to the order discharging the negro soldiers. It voiced my de-
termination to have the arbitrary action of the War Department
fully investigated, and expressed my admiration and confidence
in the heroic qualities of the American soldiers of negro nation-
ality.
        Equal Treatment for Colored Citizens
  When I offered this resolution the recollection was fresh in
my mind of the splendid appearance presented by the colored
regiments upon the return of our army from the war. I never
shall forget the military bearing, the veteran-like appearance, and
the disciplined ranks of the colored regiments marching out
Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington upon their return from the
war. The Ninth and Tenth Cavalry and the Twenty-fourth and
Twenty-fifth Infantry, all colored, were watched by thousands
of enthusiastic, patriotic, and admiring spectators.
  Let us extend fair and equal treatment to the colored citizens
of the land. If they have any infirmities, let us remember that
criticism can be made of the characteristics of any race. Let
us remember the disadvantages and the oppression under which
the negro labored until a very recent period with all opportunity
for advancement and progress withheld from him; and let us
contemplate the extraordinary and unprecedented development
which he has made since the opportunity has been afforded him.
  I have confidence in the future and I believe you have con-
fidence in the future. Many difficulties which now seem in-
surmountable gradually, and in the not far distant future, will
dissolve and pass away, and the negro people in the United
States steadily will progress to the higher plans of industrial
prosperity and education which is destined to be theirs.







                              28




			
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Progress of the Negro Race: Address at a Patriotic Race Service, Philadelphia


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